What does Jerusalem mean to me?

Aliya_LaregelA3
Image Credit: The Temple Institute, Jerusalem
“What does Jerusalem mean to me?” is a presentation about Jerusalem, through he eyes of an Old City resident, with a message of unity.
 |
Through archaeology relating to my hometown of Jerusalem, we engage in a story of Jerusalem from its origins as a Jewish city in the time of King David, with highlights of conflict throughout its history, until its eventual destruction by the Romans.
 |
The main story I present is the conflict between King Hezekiah and Sennacherib (ca. 687-701 BCE). This conflict had a tremendous impact on the kingdom of Judah: It was almost entirely destroyed by Sennacherib, shortly after the remaining inhabitants of the Kingdom of Israel were exiled, leaving Judah as a forlorn vestige of a once proud and unified kingdom.
During Sennacherib’s campaign to Judah (ca. 701 BCE), the mighty city of Lachish – where I have excavated this past summer – was destroyed. I am excited to share personal stories about sites and artifacts relevant to this story, which bring it to life, and through them share a personal message about the importance of Jerusalem.
 | |
The talk is 45-55 minutes long, and can be adjusted for different age ranges and levels: From 6th grade through adults, and from beginners to advanced learners.
|
The talk includes artifacts, slideshows and videos, and can be given on a Shabbat as well.
|
2017-05-23 01.38.03
Holding a piece of charcoal from the destruction layer of Jerusalem by the Romans. Excavated underneath our house in the Old City, during construction
  |
 |
Reviews:

Nachliel Selavan’s presentation on certain aspects of Jerusalem’s history was fascinating and highly informative. We were all enthralled by his material.

Rabbi Emanuel Feldman
Congregation Beth Jacob, Atlanta GA
 |
The talk was given with enthusiasm, clarity, by an obvious master of the subject. He was able to demonstrate the connection between archeological finds and Biblical verses, such that it felt as if we were discussing current events. The discussion left me craving to learn more about the Prophets and their history.
Rabbi Ilan D. Feldman
Congregation Beth Jacob, Atlanta GA
 
Nachliel brings a unique perspective to​ a fascinating subject, and our group of young professionals was enthralled by his multimedia presentation. Drawing on his own personal archaeological experience, he makes the ancient cities of Lachish and Jerusalem come alive, and breathes life into the Biblical characters of King David, King Hezekiah and Sannecherib.
Rabbi Yehoshua Lewis
|
2017-05-23 01.38.08
King David’s unanimous coronation in Hebron was the beginning of the Unified Kingdom

|

Nachaliel gave a great presentation at Congregation Etz Ahaim over Shabbat without any slide shows. His fluency, enthusiasm and obvious expertise on the subject synchronized the biblical account with the archaeological artifacts and brought the past alive with very important moral messages for us in the present. Highly recommended.
Rabbi David Bassous
Congregation Etz Ahaim, Highland Park NJ
|
We had Nachaliel come to our campus and teach two groups of 30 + Rutgers students, most with limited Jewish background. The presentation was very well received and got great reviews from our students.
Nachaliel really brought Tanach to life and made the students feel a powerful connection to Yerushalayim.
I recommend that you bring Nachaliel down to your shul, school or campus and have him inspire your students.
Rabbi Meir Goldberg
Meor Rutgers Jewish Xperience
 |
Great speaker. Loved the guy! Everyone has been great so far but he was special as well.
 Student
|
To arrange a talk fitting to your school, campus or community, please reach out to me at info@torahintermedia.com
 |

One thought on “What does Jerusalem mean to me?

    bassous said:
    May 14, 2017 at 11:55 am

    Nachaliel gave a great presentation at Congregation Etz Ahaim over Shabbat without any slide shows.His fluency, enthusiasm and obvious expertise on the subject synchronized the biblical account with the archaeological artifacts and brought the past alive with very important moral messages for us in the present. Highly recommended.
    Rabbi David Bassous

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s